“Trustworthy, reliable and accurate news stories are more important now than ever…”

So says Stuff – but do their claims measure up to their content?

The news giant, like almost all other information media outlets, finds itself struggling to stay afloat and remain relevant in these turbulent times.

Some, such as Bauer, elected to let themselves sink rather than fight to keep their heads above water.

Stuff, however, is made of sterner… well, stuff.

With the reality of their situation becoming increasingly dire, the powers that be decided they would have to bite the bullet.

Yes, this meant requesting donations.

A pop-up banner appears when a reader navigates to the home page of Stuff’s website.

An editor for Stuff, who wished to remain anonymous, spoke exclusively to The Stuffed Herald.

“We didn’t want to follow The Herald’s tactic and hide our most interesting articles behind a paywall,” he said.

“That was a bit of a dick move. It pissed people off, especially given the prices they were charging.”

Instead of charging a subscription, Stuff is asking readers to donate “for as little as $1”.

Pleas for support are embedded within each article, at the top and bottom of the page.

Stuff isn’t fussy. Even $1 will do.

Our Herald asked the editor to explain the reasoning behind Stuff’s marketing tactic – namely, their claims to reliability and accuracy.

“Well, we were taking the mickey out of ourselves a bit,” he admitted. “We know reliability and accuracy isn’t our strong point.”

Why say it, then?

“It was meant to be tongue-in-cheek. We were hoping that if we made readers laugh, they’d donate.

We know articles are often riddled with errors. Please take our claims with a grain of salt.”

When asked how much readers have donated so far, the editor declined to comment.

“Please, please donate,” he pleaded. “We’ll try harder, we promise.”

Disclaimer: In case it's not immediately obvious to you, we're a satire website. The content above is meant for entertainment purposes and contains hyperbole, blatantly false statements and should not be taken as fact. If you're upset by some of the content, we suggest immediately heading to your doctor and asking for a prescription for some concrete pills, and perhaps a therapist to help you figure out why you are upset by strangers' opinions on the internet.

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